I also use trees to make skateboard decks. I pretend that they are long poems that started in the woods and washed up on the beach and after much pressure, many hacks, and sanding rhythms become tools of deconstruction.

  haole rot manifesto pt. 1 -  Honolulu Museum of Art School Nanogallery, July 2016 Homemade skateboard decks and trimmings (Great Lakes region maple, manufactured at Sunset Beach, O‘ahu), wood scraps (Dad’s woodpile), Independent skate truck (Brother’s board), stolen concrete and asphalt (Kaka‘ako and State property), potting soil, planter pots, spray paint, bolts. (Photo: Alec Singer)  “The question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from the question of what kind of people we want to be, what kinds of social relations we seek, what relations to nature we cherish, what style of life we desire, what aesthetic values we hold. The right to the city is, therefore, far more than a right of individual or group access to the resources that the city embodies: it is a right to change and reinvent the city more after our hearts' desire. It is, moreover, a collective rather than an individual right, since reinventing the city inevitably depends upon the exercise of a collective power over the processes of urbanization. The freedom to make and remake ourselves and our cities is, I want to argue, one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights. How best then to exercise that right?”   -David Harvey,  Rebel Cities

haole rot manifesto pt. 1 - Honolulu Museum of Art School Nanogallery, July 2016
Homemade skateboard decks and trimmings (Great Lakes region maple, manufactured at Sunset Beach, O‘ahu), wood scraps (Dad’s woodpile), Independent skate truck (Brother’s board), stolen concrete and asphalt (Kaka‘ako and State property), potting soil, planter pots, spray paint, bolts. (Photo: Alec Singer)

“The question of what kind of city we want cannot be divorced from the question of what kind of people we want to be, what kinds of social relations we seek, what relations to nature we cherish, what style of life we desire, what aesthetic values we hold. The right to the city is, therefore, far more than a right of individual or group access to the resources that the city embodies: it is a right to change and reinvent the city more after our hearts' desire. It is, moreover, a collective rather than an individual right, since reinventing the city inevitably depends upon the exercise of a collective power over the processes of urbanization. The freedom to make and remake ourselves and our cities is, I want to argue, one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights. How best then to exercise that right?”   -David Harvey, Rebel Cities

  haole rot manifesto pt. 3   - Gallery ‘Iolani, April-May 2017  Handcrafted skateboard deck and trimmings (Great Lakes region maple veneer, Kāne‘ohe mango core veneer), Paumalū (Sunset Beach) sand, found plastic mannequin torso, organic indigo stain, wood glue, nails.  “The Hawaii brand is a powerful and emotive tool for selling local products worldwide. There are many variations on the theme, each recognizing the importance of remaining truly local and authentic.” (Yu, Lianne. “Made in Hawaii,” Hawaii Business Magazine. August, 2016)  I make skateboards by hand on the North Shore of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i—the epicenter of skateboarding’s forefather: surfing. Wow! Truly local and authentic…  [TOUCH THIS STOLEN SAND AND TRY NOT TO REMOVE IT]  ...meanwhile in the periphery, in the trimmings that drop from saw to floor, in the sawdust: hands that planted a maple tree in Canada, a distant mill planing, meadows of indigo elsewhere waving, a floating fleet ferrying mango seeds across the water, giant steel vats of glue somewhere mixing, CO2 in the atmosphere I am pumping there when I click “ship.”  [GENTLY FINGER THE EDGES OF DEAD MAPLE IF YOU MUST]  But, label anything “Made in Hawaii” and who won’t buy it, wanting a small sunny piece of that dark woman lying on the beach?  [STROKE HER IF THAT'S YOU]

haole rot manifesto pt. 3  - Gallery ‘Iolani, April-May 2017

Handcrafted skateboard deck and trimmings (Great Lakes region maple veneer, Kāne‘ohe mango core veneer), Paumalū (Sunset Beach) sand, found plastic mannequin torso, organic indigo stain, wood glue, nails.

“The Hawaii brand is a powerful and emotive tool for selling local products worldwide. There are many variations on the theme, each recognizing the importance of remaining truly local and authentic.” (Yu, Lianne. “Made in Hawaii,” Hawaii Business Magazine. August, 2016)

I make skateboards by hand on the North Shore of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i—the epicenter of skateboarding’s forefather: surfing. Wow! Truly local and authentic…

[TOUCH THIS STOLEN SAND AND TRY NOT TO REMOVE IT]

...meanwhile in the periphery, in the trimmings that drop from saw to floor, in the sawdust: hands that planted a maple tree in Canada, a distant mill planing, meadows of indigo elsewhere waving, a floating fleet ferrying mango seeds across the water, giant steel vats of glue somewhere mixing, CO2 in the atmosphere I am pumping there when I click “ship.”

[GENTLY FINGER THE EDGES OF DEAD MAPLE IF YOU MUST]

But, label anything “Made in Hawaii” and who won’t buy it, wanting a small sunny piece of that dark woman lying on the beach?

[STROKE HER IF THAT'S YOU]